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A 31-year-old Nigerian man living in Delhi has been tested positive for monkeypox on Tuesday. According to the reports, the man has been admitted to the Lok Nayak Hospital in Delhi after experiencing symptoms. With this, the capital reported its third monkeypox case, while the total tally has now reached eight.

The Union Ministry of Health and Family Affairs confirmed that the patient does not have any foreign travel history. Union Health Minister Mansukh Mandaviya confirmed that India has a total of eight monkeypox cases and out of which five patients have a history of foreign travel.

Earlier on Sunday, a 35-year-old Nigerian man also tested positive for monkeypox. The patient was admitted to Lok Nayak hospital soon after and his samples have been sent to the National Institute of Virology, Pune for testing.

Read Also: Monkeypox: Amid rise in cases, 21-day isolation, screening at airports, railway stations and bus stands in Bengaluru

The first monkeypox case in Delhi was reported in a 34-year-old man from Paschim Vihar. The patient is currently undergoing treatment. According to the reports, his condition is stable, and he has no symptoms other than lesions.

Earlier in the day, Kerala reported the fifth case of viral infection in a 30-year-old man. The patient is currently admitted to the Manjeri Medical College in Malappuram. The reports state that the patient returned from UAE on July 27.

On Saturday, India reported the first monkeypox fatality. The deceased was a 22-year-old man from Kerala who tested positive for the virus following his return from the United Arab Emirates.

Meanwhile, Karnataka’s capital Bengaluru on Tuesday ordered screening at airports, railway stations and bus stands amid rising monkeypox cases in India.

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